Category Archives: Amish/Mennonite

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Amish

The Amish, descendants of the Swiss Anabaptists, are known for their distinctive, plain clothes as well as their commitment to rejecting modern technology, including in some cases cars and electricity. They base their morals and way of life on the Bible, which they interpret literally, and on unwritten rules known as the Ordnung. Amish pastors are called bishops.

Filed in Amish/Mennonite, Christianity

Anabaptist

A Christian movement rooted in the Protestant Reformation. Anabaptists believe in baptism for adults only, nonresistance, the separation of church and state, and simplicity. Early Anabaptists believed they should live separated from the world around them. The best-known Anabaptist churches in the United States are the Amish and Mennonite.

Filed in Amish/Mennonite, Christianity

bishop

In Catholic, Orthodox and Anglican churches and some Protestant denominations that have an episcopal or hierarchical form of government, bishop is the highest order of ordained ministry. The distinction between a Catholic bishop and an archbishop is an honorary one, and an archbishop has no authority over a neighboring diocese. Some groups, including the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, the Amish and some Pentecostals, use the title bishop for someone who is the pastor of a congregation. Capitalize when used as a formal title before a name. On second reference, use only the cleric’s last name. Lowercase bishop in other uses.

Filed in Amish/Mennonite, Anglican/Episcopalian, Catholicism, Christianity, Mormonism, Orthodoxy, Pentecostalism, Protestantism, Religious titles

Christ

The word means anointed one or messiah in Greek. For that reason, Christians refer to Jesus of Nazareth as Jesus Christ or simply Christ.

Filed in Adventism, Amish/Mennonite, Anglican/Episcopalian, Baptist/Southern Baptist, Catholicism, Christian Science, Christianity, Jehovah’s Witnesses, Mormonism, Orthodoxy, Pentecostalism, Protestantism, Quaker

church

Has multiple meanings. It can mean a building, a gathering of people, a civilly incorporated body, the sum total of all Christians on the planet, or an idea in the mind of God. When reading formal documents of the Catholic Church, it is especially important to figure out which one of these definitions is operative. Capitalize as part of the formal name of a building. Lowercase in phrases where the church is used in an institutional sense, as in separation of church and state.

Filed in Amish/Mennonite, Anglican/Episcopalian, Baptist/Southern Baptist, Catholicism, Christian Science, Christianity, Jehovah’s Witnesses, Orthodoxy, Pentecostalism, Protestantism, Quaker

Mennonite

Mennonites trace their origins to the Swiss Anabaptist movement of the 16th century. Today, there are several kinds of Mennonite communities in North America. Old Order Mennonites are quite similar to the Amish in dress and rejection of modern conveniences, but many other Mennonites wear contemporary clothing, live in urban communities and are distinguished chiefly by a commitment to social justice and a refusal to salute the flag, which they regard as idolatrous.

Filed in Amish/Mennonite

rumspringa

Some Amish allow their youth, after age 16, to spend a couple years free of the most intense restrictions of their faith while still living with their parents. The purpose is to make sure they are committed to their faith before they are baptized. The vast majority decide to remain within the Amish community.

Filed in Amish/Mennonite

savior

Always capitalize when referring to Jesus Christ.

Filed in Adventism, Amish/Mennonite, Anglican/Episcopalian, Baptist/Southern Baptist, Catholicism, Christian Science, Christianity, Orthodoxy, Pentecostalism, Protestantism, Quaker